Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Marvel 1602: by Lauren Meyer

Q1: The Marvel 1602 graphic novel is illustrated in a very congruent way. The gutter on every page is black which really sets a dark tone and creates a strong contrast against the panels. The panels themselves are sketchy, and lack detail, almost to the point of being cartoonish. The colors that are used are more natural and dull, which works well with the historical setting of the work. If they had used a lot of bright vibrant color, I think it would have detracted or contradicted the overall storyline as it is set in a time period where there weren't as many vibrant colors in everyday life, especially since most things are lit by candle light instead of synthetic light. 


Q2: This story is uniquely suited to exist as a graphic novel because of the vast amount of characters involved. There are many characters represented from the Marvel universe but they exist in Elizabethan England. Some of the characters are not initially revealed and are only exposed later in the story. If this were a movie, there is no way you could incorporate this many characters without losing the audience. Plus, so much happens within the work that it would never be converted to film form without a lot of the story being cut. I also think that this work would lose something if it was simply in written form for the same reason. There are so many characters, that without a visual aid, it would be difficult for the reader to keep track of each individual storyline taking place simultaneously.


Q3: This comic is interesting because it takes on the question of how superheroes and villains originate. It plays with themes of time and space and asks the question, do superheroes arrive when we need them? Or does their existence give birth to an equal evil in the world. The character known as Captain America is the key figure in this work. He is actually from the future but is sent back to this time (1600's) by mistake, thus creating the rift which will ultimately destroy the universe if left to take its course. So is Captain America ultimately the bad guy because his presence in the past is causing this catastrophic event? Additionally, his presence sparks other mutants to form somehow, and many of them are killed on accounts of which craft. When told he has to return to the future, Captain America says he is going to stay which makes him seem kind of selfish. It is hard to say whether he is good or bad and further complicates the issues of good and evil. 

Q4: I think one one the most important panels in this comic is in part 7 when they are attempting to burn many of the mutants in the name of God as an act of holy war. Magneto is tied to a stake and is speaking with one of the priests who is about to burn him. The priest reveals that Enrique was taken as a boy from the Ghetto where his Jewish family lived in order to "save his immortal soul." And even though his family and he pleaded to be reunited, he was kept as a charge in the Catholic Church. The priests says, "You were raised as a child of the Church, Enrique. You were shown God's mercy, and you have rejected it." This shows the underlying theme of racial and social prejudice within the comic. The church is persecuting the "Witchbreed" in the name of God, however, it is evidential that this is truly just a form of racial hatred and persecution. 

REMINDERS

REMEMBER, The Research Paper is due THIS FRIDAY BY 5pm. No late papers will be accepted. This is a major grade, so please don't flake out on me. You can e-mail it to me at jgrasso@ecok.edu or jgrasso91@gmail.com. 

The SIXTH TEMPLATE RESPONSE was due last week. A few of you still haven't posted it or e-mailed it to me. If I get it by Friday I'll give you half credit. If you don't turn it in at all, you'll lose 20 points (or 20% of your grade). Since you already presented on it, as well as read the book, it seems a shame not to turn in the template response. 

Let me know if you have any questions or difficulties. Otherwise, I look forward to reading the final paper! 

Iron Man: Legacy of Doom by Ally Gregory

Q1)
The comic book is illustrated with a really cartoonish feel to it. Faces were note symmetrical and were crudely drawn. The colors used were really bright too. For me it created a less strict type of feel/tone; a fun one. One where silly jokes naturally flow so I think the feel of the artwork goes with the grain of the story since it compliments it.

Q2)
I think this was written as a comic book because the stories the content writers were trying to get across were able to be expressed in the comic book form. I think the medium also allowed the writers to target a specific audience. If this comic was translated into a movie it would lose its ability to slow down time when needed to draw more attention to the frames they want the reader to focus on the most. I really enjoyed page 15 where Spiderman is shooting his web. To me this frame was awesome because of the image of Spiderman shooting the web out of his wrist and it allows the reader to spend as much time as they need to while they day dream about wanting to be able to do such a thing…. This would be lost in a movie. In a novel the image would not be there either.

Q3)
In the short story that I got to read of Spiderman, the ethics that were covered for a superhero to have were someone who save other people from some sort of harm or danger and I also read a part that I think I could use to advocate that this comic also insisted that a superhero did not doubt themselves; they were people who believe in themselves (page 14).

Q4)
I choose to point out page 14, the top row. This is where Spiderman had a freak out moment where he doubted his own abilities thinking that what he was doing was not possible – as he was doing it. I like how this scene was happening as Spiderman was swinging in the air making this the hardest part in the story that he had to overcome. Once he did he finally had the remedy to fight back against the contraption that made him doubt so harshly and was then able to defeat the enemy.

Monday, December 26, 2016

Spiderman (Title N/A), by John C. Embry

Q1)
The comic book is illustrated with a really cartoonish feel to it. Faces were note symmetrical and were crudely drawn. The colors used were really bright too. For me it created a less strict type of feel/tone; a fun one. One where silly jokes naturally flow so I think the feel of the artwork goes with the grain of the story since it compliments it.

Q2)
I think this was written as a comic book because the stories the content writers were trying to get across were able to be expressed in the comic book form. I think the medium also allowed the writers to target a specific audience. If this comic was translated into a movie it would lose its ability to slow down time when needed to draw more attention to the frames they want the reader to focus on the most. I really enjoyed page 15 where Spiderman is shooting his web. To me this frame was awesome because of the image of Spiderman shooting the web out of his wrist and it allows the reader to spend as much time as they need to while they day dream about wanting to be able to do such a thing…. This would be lost in a movie. In a novel the image would not be there either.

Q3)
In the short story that I got to read of Spiderman, the ethics that were covered for a superhero to have were someone who save other people from some sort of harm or danger and I also read a part that I think I could use to advocate that this comic also insisted that a superhero did not doubt themselves; they were people who believe in themselves (page 14).

Q4)
I choose to point out page 14, the top row. This is where Spiderman had a freak out moment where he doubted his own abilities thinking that what he was doing was not possible – as he was doing it. I like how this scene was happening as Spiderman was swinging in the air making this the hardest part in the story that he had to overcome. Once he did he finally had the remedy to fight back against the contraption that made him doubt so harshly and was then able to defeat the enemy.

X-Men Unlimited: Sabretooth Among Us by Daniel Bonar

Q1: The illustrations in this comic are sketchy and extremely colorful. The comic was published in '93 and it's color palate shows its age. Vibrant electric yellows and cobalt blues are very common. They include things like really low pony Tails on guys and Mazda miattas that also help illustrate the difference between comics in 93 and right now.

Q2: This work could only work as a comic book because in addition to a plethora of characters and their individual histories that you are expected to know, the entire story jumps continents multiple times and is easily lost


Q3: The main focus of ethics in this issue surround addiction. They cover the standpoint of "we should just kill him" because Sabertooth is addicted to blood and killing, we see Sabertooth trying to get himself killed because he just wants to be rid of his addiction, and we see the subject of rehabilitation vs. Incarceration in terms of justice as posed by Charles Xavier.


Q4: The main frame I would focus on is at the end of the comic where Xavier and Sabertooth are walking in the hologram prison and they converse over the past and future of Sabertooth, Xavier states that their goal is to rehabilitate Sabertooth THEN turn him over to the authorities. This is the only way that justice could take place, because until Sabertooth is rehabilitated he will always be an animal and justice can never really come to be unless he sees the folly of his actions.

The Flash: Wanted by Tasha Mckaughan


The Flash: Wanted 


1. The illustrations in this comic are very detailed and realistic, I really enjoyed the artwork and the story it told. The colors are bright even when things aren’t exactly happy but the detail on the character’s faces show their emotion so the colors don’t really take away from the seriousness of the scene. 


2. There are Flash movies and series on Netflix, which I have watched, I enjoyed both the comic and the films. The comic does tell a different kind of story but I think the films do a good job in representing The Flash. You really need the artwork to tell the story because without it you would really miss the important emotions that the characters show and all the color that adds to the story that you could not get with a normal novel. 


3. The ethics of Flash area that of a hero because although he is told he will murder a man he still fights for justice and tries to find out who really kills the man and bring that person to justice. While the Renegades believe themselves to be in the right and Flash is the villain that must be stopped. Much like the heroes of X-Men and Black Panther. All three stories really depend in what prospective you read them in. So is Flash the true hero being framed for a murder he didn’t commit or are the Renegades the heroes trying to destroy a rough Flash? That’s up to you the reader to decide.


4. I chose a scene on pages 8-9 where they are watching Mirror Monarch’s body being loaded into an ambulance and Iris states “So you believe them?” “Yeah” “Do you think you’re guilty of murder?” “Crimson cowl on or off, I’m a cop. If there was no other choice, if it saved an innocent life, I wouldn’t like it, but I’d do what I’d have to do. But you know I’d never murder someone in cold blood. They’re going to sweep Mirror Monarch’s body at the lab. I’ll find some evidence. I’ll show them they have the wrong suspect, and find the right one.”
I thought this was an important section that shows his ethical dilemma and also gives us a look into what his plans are. While he admits he is capable and willing to kill someone as long as it was for the greater good, he will continue to search for the clues to who committed the crime and catch them to prove his innocence.  

Dark Horse Comic's, The Legend of Korra: "Friends for Life" by Greg Votaw

Q1: Aesthetics
This comic can best be described as cartoony, artistic, and tight. Bright coloring is used in the creation of this comic and brings about a sense of comfort and joy. I felt no impending doom foreshadowed and had a great sense of closure in this particular setting. This comic seems more geared to a younger audience and lays out some principles that are applicable to growing up. The feelings relative to the comic and others read in class fir upon a different spectrum. The legend of Korra is more cheery and friendly than others we have read.
Q2: Why a graphic novel
Though this comic has been made into a television series, I still believe its portrayal to be very important to be represented as a graphic novel. The graphic novel allows its reader to look deeper into scenes and context of the characters, rather than trying to keep the reader/viewer entertained by quick motions and a pushing rapid narrative. The reader is better able to take in scenes and dialogue while also being able to dissect the dialogue into more meaningful phrases. In addition, many things could be missed such as the internal speaking of our protagonist Korra.
Q3: Ethics
The ethics in this comic seem minor compared to the other graphic novels we have read. However, it introduces some ideas to the reader that are very much applicable to daily life. Korra is faced with a destiny to become the next avatar, one who can manipulate the four elements of fire, water, air, and earth. Korra must go through strict training in order to achieve her destiny to keep peace between the nations. Though she is very young and high-spirited and almost knocks out her master, Katara. She is given a warning to avoid the polar bear dogs by her parents, but immediately disobeys them after they have gone to sleep by sneaking out. Our heroin displays a sense of going against rules out of curiosity. This leads readers to believe that curiosity can sometimes trump the rules in order to satisfy a thirst for knowledge and self-fulfillment. Though it seems like an everyday occurrence to an older reader, it nonetheless poses a problem in trying to raise younger people to teach them correct behavior. Korra's actions do lead into a god outcome, which is discussed in my next question.
Q4: Significance
Korra's disobedience leads her to an abandoned polar bear dog pup, for which she bribes him through food due to his being hungry. After he takes the meat, she is able to build a makeshift shelter through her powers and creates a safe home for them to rest through the storm. After her parents find her through much worry they are astounded by her new companion, but it is only through the wisdom of the elder that Korra is able to keep her newfound companion for which she comes to have through the rest of the series.